Linguistic Anthropology Faculty at The University of Virginia

Ellen Contini-Morava

Professor & Chair
Ph.D. Columbia University 1983

My general area of interest is the relationship between the meanings of grammatical forms and discourse: what kinds of meanings do grammatical forms signal, and what kinds of messages do they convey?

Specializations:
Meanings and discourse functions of grammatical forms; pragmatics; linguistic theory and method; African linguistics (especially Bantu).


Eve Danziger

Associate Professor
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 1991

"The theoretical focus of my research has been on the role which cultural meaning-systems play in individual psychology."

Specializations:
Linguistic Relativity; Mayan Linguistics; Social Organization and Social Identity; Shifter Terms and Subjectivity in Language; Spontaneous Sign Languages; Ideologies of Symbolic Representation; Relationship between Semantics and Grammar.

Lise Dobrin

Research Assistant Professor
PhD University of Chicago 1999

"I am a linguist trained in phonology and morphology, areas of grammar having to do with sound structure...I am impressed by the degree to which linguistic form can serve as an 'anchor' or organizational reference point within a language's grammar, even apart from any meanings it conveys, and I am interested in how this tendency can be expressed theoretically."

Specializations:
Morphology, phonology, Arapeshan, Hebrew, Tok Pisin, Melanesia, language shift/death/revitalization.

Dell Hymes

Commonwealth Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus
Ph.D. Indiana University 1955

"I am interested in what is done in the study of the use of language, oral narrative and poetry, the history of anthropology and linguistics, Native Americans, theology."

Specializations:
I still know something about the history of anthropology and of linguistics, and ethnography of speaking, but am actively concerned mostly with verbal traditions and languages of Oregon and Washington. (Other cases come up, as recently Wintu (Loon Woman), Mohave (Kroeber's texts), Saami ('Lapp'), and characteristics of oral epic (because of gatherings at Turku)).

Virginia Hymes (emerita)

Lecturer, Emerita
M.A. Indiana University 1954

'My earliest interest in anthropology was ... a fascination with how ... different people work out ways of being human, raising children, living in families, celebrating seasonal rituals. My work on oral narratives, and their analysis as a kind of poetry, has involved narratives in Sahaptin (at the Warm Springs reservation in Oregon), other Native American languages and English. Most recently I have developed my interest in gender issues and in Native American women..."

Specializations:
Linguistic anthropology, North American Indian ethnography and linguistics, analysis of oral narrative, ethnography of speaking.

 

Daniel Lefkowitz

Associate Professor
Ph.D. Unversity of Texas, 1995

"I am interested in emotion, identity, and social power. My approach to these issues is through discourse, linking quantitative sociolinguistics with interpretive ethnography to look at how social structures are constituted, reinforced, and opposed in everyday communicative practices."

Specializations:
Language and Culture; Language and Identity; Language and Emotion; Sociolinguistics; Semiotics; Semitic Languages; Middle Eastern Societies; Intonation; Discourse Analysis;

David Sapir

Professor
Ph.D. Harvard University 1964

"My initial field work was with the language and folklore of the Kujamaat Jóola of Southern Sénégal. Subsequent field work investigated their social organization and social symbolism. Language, folklore and social symbolism center on symbolism in general and inform my broader theoretical interests, the central place of symbolism in human thought."

Specializations:
West African language, lexicography, translation, folklore and symbolism; the nature of symbolism; the history and practice of still photography.

Affiliated Faculty in Other Departments
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